Research-inclusive Courses

Finding a position in a lab can be challenging, especially for undergraduates. There are more students interested in acquiring a research experience than there are research experiences available. Another way to gain research experience is by taking classes that incorporate research into the curriculum. Listed in these pages are research-inclusive courses offered at Queens College.

ARTH 300. Senior Colloquium in Art History Methods

Prereq.: permission of the department. Required for all majors in art history. Offered in the fall semester and must be taken in the student’s senior year. An introduction to both the practical methods of research and writing in art history and to the range of intellectual approaches to the interpretation of works of art, including style and connoisseurship, iconography, and psychological and sociological methods. Emphasis is on reading and class discussion, and on a series of exercises to develop techniques for effective presentation of ideas in both written and oral form, culminating in an illustrated lecture.

ARTH 320.1–320.4. Internship

Prereq.: ENGL 110; 3.0 department average; a letter of acceptance detailing the research project from the program to which student is applying; permission of the art history advisor. An independent course in which a student works for a semester as an intern in a museum or an agency dealing with works of art. The course permits the student to develop and undertake a special research project related to the internship under the supervision of a department advisor. Evaluation of the student will be based on a report from a supervisor on student’s work and a written report on the project.

ARTH 330. Special Problems

Prereq.: College average 2.75, department average 3.3. Open to a limited number of qualified students who want to do independent work in the history of art. Written application for permission to enroll, stating in detail the nature and scope of the proposed project, must be submitted to the department chair at least one month prior to the date of registration. Fall, Spring

ARTS 254. – ARTS 379. Special Projects in Studio Art

Prereq.: Completion of Level 1 and 2 requirements and ARTH 101 and 102, and permission of the instructor and deputy chair of Studio Art. Any title may be repeated for a maximum of six credits with permission of the department. Special Projects courses are designed for students who want more intensive work in any studio discipline, or to strengthen or advance their basic skills in:

Drawing, Painting, Sculpture, Illustration,Woodcut, Intaglio, Lithography, Serigraphy, Photography, Ceramics.

ARTS 393. Independent Internship

Prereq.: College average 2.75, department average 3.4. Open to a limited number of qualified students who want to do independent work in a related arts organization. Written application for permission to enroll, stating in detail the nature and scope of the proposed project, must be submitted to the department deputy chair at least one month prior to the date of registration. BFA students are encouraged to use one 3-credit elective (ARTS 393) course for an internship at one of the department-approved nonprofit arts organizations in New York City. The department maintains a list of these organizations, and students can see the deputy chair of Studio Art or a faculty advisor for advice and arrangements with an individual organization.

ARTH 300. Senior Colloquium in Art History Methods

Prereq.: permission of the department. Required for all majors in art history. Offered in the fall semester and must be taken in the student’s senior year. An introduction to both the practical methods of research and writing in art history and to the range of intellectual approaches to the interpretation of works of art, including style and connoisseurship, iconography, and psychological and sociological methods. Emphasis is on reading and class discussion, and on a series of exercises to develop techniques for effective presentation of ideas in both written and oral form, culminating in an illustrated lecture.

ARTH 320.1–320.4. Internship

Prereq.: ENGL 110; 3.0 department average; a letter of acceptance detailing the research project from the program to which student is applying; permission of the art history advisor. An independent course in which a student works for a semester as an intern in a museum or an agency dealing with works of art. The course permits the student to develop and undertake a special research project related to the internship under the supervision of a department advisor. Evaluation of the student will be based on a report from a supervisor on student’s work and a written report on the project.

ARTH 330. Special Problems

Prereq.: College average 2.75, department average 3.3. Open to a limited number of qualified students who want to do independent work in the history of art. Written application for permission to enroll, stating in detail the nature and scope of the proposed project, must be submitted to the department chair at least one month prior to the date of registration. Fall, Spring

ARTS 254. – ARTS 379. Special Projects in Studio Art

Prereq.: Completion of Level 1 and 2 requirements and ARTH 101 and 102, and permission of the instructor and deputy chair of Studio Art. Any title may be repeated for a maximum of six credits with permission of the department. Special Projects courses are designed for students who want more intensive work in any studio discipline, or to strengthen or advance their basic skills in:

Drawing, Painting, Sculpture, Illustration,Woodcut, Intaglio, Lithography, Serigraphy, Photography, Ceramics.

ARTS 393. Independent Internship

Prereq.: College average 2.75, department average 3.4. Open to a limited number of qualified students who want to do independent work in a related arts organization. Written application for permission to enroll, stating in detail the nature and scope of the proposed project, must be submitted to the department deputy chair at least one month prior to the date of registration. BFA students are encouraged to use one 3-credit elective (ARTS 393) course for an internship at one of the department-approved nonprofit arts organizations in New York City. The department maintains a list of these organizations, and students can see the deputy chair of Studio Art or a faculty advisor for advice and arrangements with an individual organization.

CMLIT 390. Internship

Prereq.: Completion of 9 credits in comparative literature and approval of the department. Comparative literature students are given the opportunity to use and improve their skills and knowledge through working for credit. Fields in which student interns may work include: literature, cultural studies, history, international relations, and media. Students may contact the college’s Office of Career Development for internship placement information, or may get information directly from a workplace. Students should see the Comparative Literature Department for information on writing a proposal for the internship and securing a faculty sponsor. The department must approve the internship before registration. The student’s grade will be based on the employer’s and the faculty sponsor’s assessment of the student’s work. The student will submit a research paper on the work done in the internship. A limit of 6 credits of internships may be taken. Of these 6 credits, no more than 3 can be counted toward the comparative literature major or minor.

DRAM 130. Writing About Performance. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: ENGL 110. DRAM 130 fulfills the College Writing 2 requirement and builds on the work of English 110 (College Writing 1), in order to teach the conventions of writing in the discipline of drama. In this writing seminar students will examine and practice the art of writing about performance in order to develop their eyes as audience members and their voices and technique as writers. Different iterations of this course will focus on mastering performance writing genres such as the review essay or professional arts/ grant writing; all iterations will conclude with a research paper on a performance-based topic. (EC2)

DRAM 390. Special Problems in Drama and Theatre.
DRAM 390.1 – 390.3, 1-3 hrs.; 1-3 credits.
Prereq.: Permission of the department.  Individual research under the direction of a member or members of the department and resulting in a written report.  May be repeated for credit.

DRAM 397. Seminar in Drama and Theatre. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: Permission of department. Topic to vary from semester to semester.

ENGL 130. Writing about Literature In English. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 110. ENGL 130 fulfills the College Writing 2 requirement and builds on the work of English 110 (College Writing 1), in order to teach the conventions of writing in the discipline of English. The course focuses on the study of Anglophone literature and how to engage in scholarly conversations about literature by using close reading of primary and secondary sources, conducting original research, and developing analytical arguments about literary texts in different genres.

ENGL 170W. Introduction to Literary Study. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 110. An inquiry into what it means to study literature, involving close reading and critical analysis of a wide variety of prose fiction, drama, and poetry, and informed by an introduction to some of the theoretical issues currently invigorating literary studies. This course combines a study of literature with continued training in clear and effective expression. Designed for prospective English majors and other interested students. (H3)

ENGL 391W. Senior Seminar: Topics in Literature. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: English major with senior status or consent of the instructor. This course allows the instructor and a small group of advanced English majors to pursue in depth a topic in literature or literary theory.

ENGL 399W. Department Honors Seminar. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: Enrollment in the English Department’s Honors Program. This seminar, required of department Honors candidates, is organized around a broad theme, often interdisciplinary, and includes individual research projects, which are presented at a student conference in the Spring. The seminar is taken twice, in the Fall and Spring of the same academic year, and this two-semester sequence counts toward the requirements for Honors in English. Three credits of 399W replace the senior seminar required for the major, and the additional three credits replace one of the six electives for the major.

SPAN 390. Hispanic Literature Seminar

Prereq.: ENGL 110, 3 courses in Hispanic literature, and senior standing. Intensive reading and discussion of literary, cultural, theoretical, and critical texts and student research and writing centered around a specific topic in Hispanic literature.

SPAN 391. Seminar in Spanish Language and Linguistics

Prereq.: SPAN 224, 225, and 337, and senior standing, or permission of the department. Intensive student participation on varying themes, problems, and theories in language and linguistics. Possible topics include sociolinguistics, dialectology, history of the Spanish language, bilingualism, languages in contact, language and ethnic identity, language and gender, etc.

SPAN 398. Internship. 135 hr.; 3 cr.

Prereq.: GPA of 3.2 or above in the major, and at least 21 credits in upper-level Spanish, plus permission of the department chair and a faculty sponsor. Offers advanced students the opportunity to engage in research under faculty supervision. Must be prearranged and approved by department chair and faculty sponsor.

HTH 375, 376. Honors Seminar for College Teaching
4 hr.; 4 cr.

Prerequisite: Permission of the director. Students participate in teaching the Freshman Humanities Colloquium with two other instructors: a Queens College professor and a Townsend Harris High School teacher. Includes planning and conducting seminar sessions, holding conferences, commenting on students’ papers, and attending a weekly workshop.

BIOL 34. Genomics Research Experience I
3 cr.

Open to freshmen only. The first part of a two-semester sequence (Biology 34 and 35) that will introduce students to the scientific method for designing procedures for investigating natural phenomena, collecting data, acquiring new knowledge, and correcting and integrating existing knowledge. Students with no background in biology will participate in an authentic research experience—integrated into a laboratory course designed for freshmen—that will result in a significant contribution to the understanding of microbial genomics. During the fall course, soil samples will be collected in the field. From these samples students will identify and purify bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria). The bacteriophages will be characterized structurally by electron microscopy, and their DNA will be purified and sequenced. (SCI) Fall

BIOL 35. Genomics Research Experience II
3 cr.

Prerequisite: BIOL 34. The second part of a two-semester sequence (Biology 34 and 35). During the spring course, open only to those completing the fall course (BIOL 34). DNA sequences of phages obtained during the fall semester will be analyzed with bioinformatic tools and compared with those of phages isolated at other locations. The goal is to identify genes and their organization, examine their similarities and differences that may characterize different phage groups, and determine how these groups may have arisen during evolution. (SCI) Spring

BIOL 200. Foundations of Research in Biology

2 lec. hr.; 2 cr.

Prerequisite: BIOL 105 and a B– or greater average in biology courses. Introduction to the critical thinking tools required to conduct research in biology. Topics include the scientific method, experimental design, and hypothesis testing; introductory statistical methods for data analysis; communication of research findings via research papers, posters, and oral talks; and ethics in
scientific research. BIOL 200 is a prerequisite for all students interested in registering in the research project courses BIOL 390, 391, 395, and 396 with faculty members in the Biology Department.

Botany

BIOL 213. Field Botany
2 lec., 1 rec., 3 lab. hr.; 4 cr.

Prerequiste: BIOL 106. Introduction to local flora and vegetation. Lectures will emphasize the structure and composition of local vegetation. Laboratories will consist mainly of field trips to parks, preserves, and botanical gardens. Students will submit a field trip report and a plant collection.

BIOL 310. Lower Plants
2 lec., 1 rec., 3 lab. hr.; 4 cr.

Prerequisite: BIOL 106 and 287. Introduction to the biology of the algae, fungi, and bryophytes of the northeastern United States. Laboratory includes several field trips.

BIOL 315. Higher Plants
2 lec., 1 rec., 3 lab. hr.; 4 cr.

Prerequisite: BIOL 107. Survey of the vascular plants with emphasis on the flowering plants and taxonomic characteristics useful in identification of major plant groups. Laboratories will be devoted to techniques of identification. Students will submit a plant collection. Field trips comprise a large part of the laboratory component; they will occupy half or whole days.

Community and Ecosystem Biology

BIOL 241. Techniques of Field Biology
1 lec., 4 lab. hr.; 3 cr.

Prerequisite: BIOL 107; CHEM 114.1, CHEM 114.4 or 159 or the equivalent. An introduction to collection and analyses of data in the field. Topics shall include design of experiments and controls, methodologies of different types of field collections, use of keys, and statistical analyses. One evening and several all-day weekend field trips to different study sites may be included. A collection may be required.

Biol 352/Anth 364. Anthropological Genomics

Exploration of how genes can be used to understand human history, ancestry, and evolution while also allowing students to participate in this growing area of knowledge by optionally collecting genetic data from their own genome.

Biol 390. Research in Biology I

Students arrange to work under the supervision of a member of the Biology faculty.

Biol 391. Research in Biology II

Students arrange to work under the supervision of a member of the Biology faculty.

Biol 395. Honors Research in Biology I

Students arrange to do honors research under the supervision of a member of the faculty.

Biol 396. Honors Research in Biology II

Students arrange to do honors research under the supervision of a member of the faculty.

CHEM 391.1–391.3. Research in Chemistry and Biochemistry

391.1, 4 hr.; 1 cr.,
391.2, 8 hr.; 2 cr.,
391.3, 12 hr.; 3 cr.

Prereq.: A grade of C or better in CHEM 252.4, and 252.1 (or 211 and 212), and permission of the department. Advanced research under the supervision of a faculty member in the department.A written report will be submitted to and approved by the department and a presentation is required. HMNS 391.1–3 may be substituted for CHEM 391.1–3, but a written report submitted to and approved bythe department and a presentation are still required. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Fall, Spring

CHEM 395. Senior Thesis

3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: Senior standing at Queens College. A grade of C or better in all intermediate (200-level) Foundation courses (see Requirements for the Major). Prereq. or coreq.: All Advanced (300-level) Foundation courses and one of the following: CHEM 387, 388, or at least 2 credit hours of CHEM 291, 321.1–3, 391.1–3, HMNS 291, or HMNS 391. Under the supervision of a faculty mentor and the support of one additional faculty member (not in the sub-discipline of the planned project), the student will prepare a senior thesis that either presents the research performed by the student or expands (using current literature) the project investigated in CHEM 387 or 388. Upon completion of the thesis, an oral presentation will be given to the department. Fall, Spring

CSCI 383. VT: Computer Science Synthesis

3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: Permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit when topics differ. An examination of computational approaches to problem solving in a variety of contexts, either within the computer science discipline or between computer science and other disciplines. Students will be given an understanding of how knowledge is developed and managed using digital technologies in various disciplines. How the course implements this structure will vary across offerings, but typically will involve determining what kinds of information form the basis for a discipline, a survey of techniques for storing and manipulating that information, and a project that either gives the student experience working with actual data sets from the discipline or investigation into alternate ways of gathering, storing, and accessing that information.

CSCI 385. VT: Computer Science Capstone

3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: Open to upper division computer science majors. May be repeated for credit when project themes differ. Each offering of this course will have a pre-announced theme that will serve as the basis for student projects that draw on one or more areas of computer science: typically, knowledge developed in previous courses in the major. Students will have the option of working in small groups, but may work individually instead. Each project group will present their initial project plan and final project summary to the class, with constructive critiques of others’ projects an essential component of the course structure.

CSCI 391. Honors Problems in Computer Science

CSCI 391.1–391.3

1–3 hr.; 1–3 cr. Prereq.: Permission of the department. Open to students majoring in computer science who, in the opinion of the department, are capable of carrying out the work of the course. Each student works on a research problem under the supervision of a member of the faculty. Fall, Spring

CSCI 393. Honors Thesis

3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: Junior or senior standing and approval of the department’s Honors and Awards Committee. The student will engage in significant research under the supervision of a faculty mentor and a thesis committee consisting of the mentor and two additional faculty members. The thesis proposal and committee must be approved by the department’s Honors and Awards Committee. Upon completion of the research paper, an oral presentation of the results, open to the public, will be given. With the approval of the mentor, thesis committee, and the department’s Honors and Awards Committee, the course may be repeated once for credit when the level of the student’s work warrants a full year of effort.

CSCI 395. Research Projects

CSCI 395.1–395.3

1–3 hr.; 1–3 cr. Prereq.: Permission of the department. Open to majors and non-majors who, in the opinion of the department, are capable of carrying out an independent project of mutual interest under the supervision of a member of the faculty.

CSCI 398. Internship

CSCI 398.1, 45 hr.; 1 cr.,
CSCI 398.2, 90 hr.; 2 cr.,
CSCI 398.3, 135 hr.; 3 cr.

Prereq.: Completion of 15 credits in computer science and approval of the department. Computer science students are given an opportunity to work and learn for credit. Students should consult the college’s Office of Career Development and Internships for listings of available internships and procedures for applying. A proposal must be approved by the department before registration. The student’s grade will be based on both the employer’s and faculty sponsor’s evaluations of the student’s performance, based on midterm and final reports. A limit of 6 credits of internships may be taken. CSCI 398 may not be applied to the computer science major or minor.

FNES 358. Research in Historic Costume

358.1, 1 hr.; 1 cr.,
358.2, 2 hr.; 2 cr.,
358.3, 3 hr.; 3 cr.

Prereq.: FNES 121, 126, 158, and permission of the department. Development of an independent research project in the conservation, analysis, dating, and/or restoration of historic costume materials. Students may register for 1, 2, or 3 credits depending on the scope of the project.††

FNES 250. Research Methods in Human Development and Family Studies

3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: FNES 147, department consent with a minimum grade “C”

FNES 307. Experimental Food Science

4 hr.; 4 cr. Prereq.: FNES 101,263 and PSYCH 107. Department consent, minimum grade all courses “C”. The students will learn the various techniques in food experimentation. Also, completing a food study that is to be interpret and evaluated.

FNES 364. Special Projects in Family and Consumer Sciences

3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: FNES 263. Students will participate in developing and carrying out research in field settings. Such factors as health status, food habits, nutrition, or other topics are studied. Using the data gathered, instruction in library research and the use of the computer and various techniques of analysis will be included.††

FNES 370. Practicum in Teaching.
Hr. to be arranged; 1 cr. Prereq.: FNES 143 and 146. The course provides students with learning experiences enabling them to practice selected teaching competencies required for successful student teaching. Students apply current knowledge and skills acquired in previous courses to the design, implementation, and evaluation of lessons focused on sport and physical education activities.††

FNES 391. Research in Physical Education

The student works on a research problem under the supervision of a member of the physical education faculty.

Math 391, 392. Special Problems

MATH 391.1–391.5, 1–5 hr.; 1–5 cr.,
MATH 392.1–392.5, 1–5 hr.; 1–5 cr. each sem.

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and permission of the chair. Each student works on a minor research problem under the supervision of a member of the department. Only students of exceptional mathematical ability and promise are admitted to the course.

Phys 390. Internship

Phys 391. Special Problems.

Each student accepted works on a minor research problem under the
supervision of a member of the staff.

Phys 395W. Senior Research Project I

The student will engage in significant research under the supervision of a faculty mentor.

Phys 396W. Senior Research Project II

The student will complete his/her research project, and summarize the results in a research paper and talk.

PSYCH 371. Practicum in Psychopathology
2 hr. plus 5 hr. fieldwork to be arranged; 3 cr.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 221, 232, senior standing, and permission of the instructor. Provides for supervised clinical observation of patients at selected psychiatric hospitals and clinics. Students observe patients, audit staff conferences, and may assist in research conducted by hospital staff or college faculty. The academic component of this course includes an in-depth study by each student of one of the major approaches to psychopathology (such as psychoanalysis or behavior therapy) and the application of that approach to a set of case protocols.†

Advanced Topics

PSYCH 311–321 Series. Advanced Experimental and Research Psychology
2 rec., 4 lab. hr.; 4 cr.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 213W. Any one of these courses fulfills the requirement for an advanced research course in psychology.

PSYCH 311. Advanced Experimental Psychology: Learning
6 hr.; 4 cr.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 213W. A laboratory course emphasizing application of experimental techniques to the study of learning in animal and human subjects. Topics covered include classical conditioning, instrumental (operant) learning, verbal learning, and a critical analysis of current controversial issues in learning.†

PSYCH 313. Advanced Experimental Psychology: Cognition
6 hr.; 4 cr.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 213W. A laboratory course emphasizing the application of experimental techniques to the study of cognition in human subjects. Among the topics covered are attention, recognition of patterns (such as speech and visual forms), imagery, storage and retrieval of information from short-term and long-term memory, and the organization of thought and language. A central theme of the course is a focus on structure and organization in these various cognitive processes.†

PSYCH 314. Advanced Experimental Psychology: Social Personality
6 hr.; 4 cr.

Prerequite: PSYCH 101, 107, 213W, and 232 or 238. This course helps students learn to evaluate research critically and how to develop methodologically sound research projects in the areas of personality and social psychology. Students analyze research articles, design studies to test hypotheses, and carry out a class project.

PSYCH 325. Fieldwork in Personnel Psychology

PSYCH 325.1, 45 hr.; 1 cr.,
PSYCH 325.2, 90 hr.; 2 cr.,
PSYCH 325.3, 135 hr.; 3 cr.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 226 and permission of the instructor. Students are assigned for 45 or 90 or 135 hours a semester to a business or organization applying some aspects of personnel psychology. Included are personnel departments, psychological consultants, and governmental agencies. Activities such as personnel testing, employment interviewing, personnel research, and employee relations functions are observed and, when feasible, participated in by the student.†

PSYCH 326. Fieldwork in Consumer Psychology

PSYCH 326.1, 45 hr.; 1 cr.,
PSYCH 326.2, 90 hr.; 2 cr.,
PSYCH 326.3, 135 hr.; 3 cr.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 226, and permission of the instructor. Students are assigned for 45 or 90 or 135 hours a semester to a business or organization applying some aspects of consumer psychology. Included are market research consultants, advertising agency research departments, manufacturers’ marketing departments, and communications media research sections. Activities such as questionnaire coding and development, statistical analysis of consumer data, advertising effectiveness research, and consumer sampling and interviewing problems are observed and, when feasible, participated in by the student. May be repeated once for additional credit.†

PSYCH 327. Fieldwork in Mental Health Settings

PSYCH 327.1, 45 hr.; 1 cr.,
PSYCH327.2, 90 hr.; 2 cr.,
PSYCH327.3, 135 hr.; 3 cr.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 221, and permission of the instructor. Students serve as volunteers in a mental health setting for 45 or 90 or 135 hours a semester. Such settings include psychiatric hospitals, psychiatric units of general hospitals, community agencies dealing with such special populations as autistic children, developmentally disabled children and adults, clinics serving patients with phobias, agencies serving children facing life-threatening diseases, etc. Activities such as interacting with patients, observing ward meetings, helping to desensitize a phobic patient, reading case records, interacting with professional mental health workers, attending case conferences, etc. are possible, depending upon the policies of the particular agency at which the student is volunteering. A term paper is required which involves library research and which focuses on some topic relevant to the particular student’s fieldwork.

PSYCH 355. Practicum in Academic Advisement of the Psychology Major
1 hr.; 1 cr.

Prerequisite: A minimum of four courses in psychology at Queens College, junior standing, and STPER 200 (Introduction to Counseling and Advisement). This course, which is open to psychology majors only, may be taken concurrently with STPER 300 (Practicum in Counseling and Advisement) or as a third-semester peer advisor. For the first half of the semester students are required to meet with the faculty advisor one hour weekly to discuss issues such as the department’s requirements and facilities, careers in psychology, and graduate training. In the second half of the semester students spend two hours per week interviewing psychology student clients.†

PSYCH 356. Advanced Practicum in Academic Advisement of the Psychology Major
1 hr.; 1 cr.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 355. During the second semester students continue interviewing clients two hours per week and participate in various projects related to advising psychology students, such as polling faculty about research opportunities, collecting information about volunteer opportunities, and contacting graduate programs for information.†

PSYCH 371. Practicum in Psychopathology
2 hr. plus 5 hr. fieldwork to be arranged; 3 cr.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 221, 232, senior standing, and permission of the instructor. Provides for supervised clinical observation of patients at selected psychiatric hospitals and clinics. Students observe patients, audit staff conferences, and may assist in research conducted by hospital staff or college faculty. The academic component of this course includes an in-depth study by each student of one of the major approaches to psychopathology (such as psychoanalysis or behavior therapy) and the application of that approach to a set of case protocols.†

PSYCH 372. Practicum: Intervention for Children with Autism and Their Families
3 hr; 3 cr.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 213W and permission of instructor. Introduction to applied behavior analysis techniques for children with developmental disabilities such as autism or Down syndrome. One portion of the class is devoted to classroom instruction regarding technical language of applied behavior analysis; basic principles; strategies to increase appropriate behavior; strategies to decrease challenging behavior; operational definition; direct observation of behavior; graphing and evaluation of data; and family needs. The second portion of the class involves students directly working with a child diagnosed with a developmental disability and providing behavior analytic interventions in social, communication, play, and leisure skills.

PSYCH 391. Special Problems–Research

PSYCH 391.1, 3 hr. per week; 1 cr.
PSYCH 391.2, 6 hr. per week; 2 cr.
PSYCH 391.3, 9 hr. per week; 3 cr.

Prerequisite: A GPA of a 3.0 or higher. Written permission of the faculty mentor and a description of the proposed research project submitted to and by the Psychology department. Open only to Psychology and Neuroscience majors. Open only to specially qualified upper juniors and seniors of exceptional promise and ability who are majoring in psychology.†
†Offered either Fall or Spring.

ENSTD 391. Special Problems in Environmental Studies

The student works on a research problem under the supervision of a member of the faculty.

HSS 350. Independent Study in the Social Sciences
Hr. to be arranged; 3 cr.

Prerequisite: HSS 200, three thematically related courses in the Social Sciences Honors program, and permission of the program director. HSS 350.3 (3 credits) may be used for the senior Capstone project.

HSS 390. Senior Research Colloquium
3 cr.

All students doing a Capstone project also will enroll in HSS 390 Senior Research Colloquium. In the colloquium students will present their work to faculty and student colleagues from across the Division of Social Sciences.

PSCI 291. Special Problems

Prereq.: Open to majors who receive permission of the department to register. A student or group of students will undertake and complete an individual research project in the field of their special interest under the direction of an instructor and with the approval of the department chair.

PSCI 292W. Internship in Urban Politics

292.4, 2 hr./wk, plus 120 semester hours intern work; 4 cr.,
292.5, 2 hr./wk., plus 150 semester hours intern work; 5 cr.,
292.9W, 2 hr./wk., plus 300 semester hours intern work; 9 cr.

Prereq.: Permission of instructor. A work-study program, offered by the department, givingfirst-hand experience in the day-to-day operations of city government. Internships available with City Councilmen, administrative offices of the Mayor, Assemblymen, District Congressional offices, and other political offices. Application for the program is made through the Political Science Dept. a minimum of one month prior to registration.

PSCI 293. Fieldwork in Political Science

Individual or group field projects or internships with prior approval of the department.

PSCI 294. Internship in Legislative Politics 12 cr.

A one-semester, full-time internship with a state legislator or administrative agency in Albany. Details, requirements, and permission for the program must be obtained from the faculty coordinator. Stipends are provided.

PSCI 295W. Internship in Law and Advocacy

295.4, 2 hr./wk., plus 120 semester hours intern work; 4 cr.,
295.5, 2 hr./wk., plus 150 semesterhours intern work; 5 cr.,
295.9W, 2 hr./wk., plus 300 semester hours intern work; 9 cr.

Prereq.: Permission of instructor. Students will work with lawyers or with legal advocacy or judicial institutions. Application for the program is made through the faculty internship coordinator in the Political Science Dept. a minimum of one month prior to registration.

PSCI 296W. Internship in International Politics

296.4, 2 hr./wk., plus 120 semester hr. of intern work; 4 cr.,
296.5 2 hr/wk, plus 150 semester hours of intern work; 5 cr.,
296.9W, 2 hr./wk., plus 300 semester hours of intern work; 9 cr.

Prereq.: Permission of instructor. Students will work with public and private institutions in the field of international relations. Application for the program is made through the faculty internship coordinator in the Political Science Dept. a minimum of one month prior to registration.

PSCI 297. Model United Nations

A simulation of the United Nations as an agent for peace in the contemporary world, including participation in a week-long Model UN event in New York City with general assembly meetings at the UN headquarters. Students will research issues before the UN in such areas as regional and world peace, economic development, education, human rights, and non- proliferation of nuclear weapons, and will prepare to participate in simulated debates and negotiations. A fee of $75 is required to register as a delegate, in addition to room and board expenses.

PSCI 298.3. Independent Internships in New York City

3 hr., 120 sem. hr. fieldwork; 3 cr. Substantive internships in local government, media, law, community work, advocacy, and international affairs. Related readings and a term paper will be assigned. Details, requirements, and permission for the program must be obtained from the faculty internship coordinator.

PSCI 298.6. Independent Internships in New York City

2 hr., 240 sem. hr. fieldwork; 6 cr. Substantive internships in local government, media, law, community work, advocacy, and international affairs. Related readings and a term paper will be assigned. Details, requirements, and permission for the program must be obtained from the faculty internship coordinator.

PSCI 299. Summer Internship in Washington, D.C.

240–320 sem. hr. fieldwork; 6 cr. Students will work eight weeks full-time in Washington, D.C., as interns for elected representatives, interest groups, or government agencies. Related readings and a term paper will be assigned. Details, requirements, applications, and permission for the program must be obtained from the faculty internship coordinator. A stipend is provided by the City University.

PSCI 381W. Seminar in American Politics

3 hr. plus conf.; 4 cr. Prereq.:Permission of the instructor.
Topics to be announced. No student may enroll in more than one seminar a semester.

PSCI 382W. Seminar in Law and Politics

3 hr. plus conf.; 4 cr. Prereq.: Permission of the instructor.
Topics to be announced. No student may enroll in more than one seminar a semester. (Capstone)

PSCI 383W. Seminar in Comparative Politics

3 hr. plus conf.; 4 cr. Prereq.: Permission of the instructor.
Topics to be announced. No student may enroll in more than one seminar a semester. (Capstone)

PSCI 384W. Seminar in International Politics

3 hr. plus conf.; 4 cr. Prereq.: Permission of the instructor.
Topics to be announced. No student may enroll in more than one seminar a semester. (Capstone)

PSCI 386W. Seminar in Political Theory

3 hr. plus conf.; 4 cr. Prereq.: Permission of the instructor.
Topics to be announced. No student may enroll in more than one seminar a semester. (Capstone)

PSCI 387W. Seminar in Political Analysis and Research Methods

3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: Permission of the instructor. No student may enroll in more than one
seminar a semester.

css.php
Need help with the Commons? Visit our
help page
Send us a message